Tips on Identifying Non-Value Added Activities

At the core of Lean is distinguishing value added from non-value added activities. Fundamental to this is for everyone creating and delivering a product or service to identify their internal customers and the final customer. These relationships are central to meeting the needs of the customer.

WHAT IS THE DEFINITION OF NON-VALUE ADDED ACTIVITIES?

Useful activities that the customer will pay for are considered value-added. So, activities or elements of the product or service that the customer does not value or is unwilling to pay for are non-value added activities. Using the Kano tool to identify product or service components that are Basic, Satisfiers and Delighters is a way to separate these and assign costs to them.

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6 thoughts on “Tips on Identifying Non-Value Added Activities

  1. One of the initial step towards getting lean is to chalk down the existing or current process map followed by your team/group. The next step is to identify and separate the non-value added or unwanted activities from the current process map, which will give you an improved/efficient process map. However there is always scope for improving your process map.
    Use the value stream mapping tool to achieve these process maps.
    You can definitely compare how much cost/time you save when you eliminated the unwanted activities from your process.

    1. Thank you. Yes, we have used a simple chalk line and once the team was sure we actually taped the floor. Value stream mapping, when the team understands it is a powerful tool, in really gets people involved and thinking.

      Thanks for sharing.

  2. Do you consider part lead time a non-value activity. This is the time between raw part order placement with a supplier, and receipt of parts at our dock.

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